DIFFERENT AREAS IN WHICH RADON TESTING IS IMPORTANT

To begin our summary of the areas in which radon testing should be done we look at the urban areas of the state which are often overlooked as potential radon contamination zones. While urban zones might be slightly safer in terms of potential radon contamination, there is still a very real danger that contamination is affecting places which have been populated by people for a very long time. The problem with radon gas is that it often sits for decades under the ground, where it is virtually undetectable if an extensive testing process isn’t used to find it. However, urban development which often includes digging deep under existing structures is exactly the type of activity which can release toxic radon gas into the air. There have been numerous cases this year alone in which radon detection crews have found radon presence in areas where housing has existed for hundreds of years. Most construction companies today have begun to employ radon testing when they undertake serious construction in urban areas, and there are even members of the state government who are pushing to make radon testing a compliance issue for urban construction projects. Local radon inspection agencies such as, www.abetterhomeinspectioncolorado.com have reported a spike in the number of radon tests being carried out in cities all across Colorado.  People should be very cautious about accepting the idea that developed areas are free of radon, as only a radon inspection is capable of determining if an area is a radon free zone.

Areas next to rivers and streams are perhaps the most at risk places for radon contamination. Radon is most often thought of as a gas, and while most radon problems take the form of air contaminated by radon, water is also at risk for contamination. Not only is radon inspection of local rivers important to have done, it is also important that the process is carried out each year. A river could have hundreds of potential points of contamination, and any number of natural shifts in the earth might cause one of these points to actively contaminate water sources. Rivers which have tested negative for radon in the past have been areas were radon has recently been found, so assuming that a once pure water source will always remain as such is a dangerous idea. Even small streams could spread radon contamination through large areas of populated land, so radon testing should be a top concern for anyone living near flowing bodies of water.

Lastly, areas which have just become populated must undergo radon inspections in order to determine they are safe. In an area that is populated by people, one can assume that at least part of the population has had radon testing done on their property. In rural areas which are just starting to see people arrive, there is a boundless possibility that radon is present in the area. If people go through the trouble of having a new area tested for radon, the chances are very good that any areas of contamination found can be isolated and removed before they become a safety issue for the people who will populate the area.